General Tso Cauliflower

Today’s recipe is not going to win any beauty contest. But then again, neither will I — unless it’s a leg contest. I think I could win that. But like me, this General Tso Tofu dish is authentic and unexpectedly flavorful, even with a bleak “resting face”.

This dish comes from Bakeaholic Mama and has that wonderful thick and creamy Chinese sauce with gingery garlicy flavors. A few things to note on where I went wrong – make it in small batches rather than all at once to ensure the cauliflower florets cooks thoroughly and still get that crispy outside. Mine was more “steamed” than “fried”. Also, use a wide and deep pan, not a wok. I did add a package of diced Chinese smoked tofu which added a kick of protein. cauliflower

GENERAL TSO CAULIFLOWER
1 large head of cauliflower cut into florets
2 tsp sesame oil
1 egg
1/3 cup corn starch
3 tbs soy sauce
Peanut oil for frying

For the sauce:
2 1/2 tsp minced ginger root
3 cloves of minced garlic
1 1/2 cups vegetable stock
1/3 cup soy sauce
2 tbs cornstarch
2 tsp garlic chili sauce
1/4 cup brown sugar, loosely packed
1 tbs sesame oil
1 tbs peanut oil
Brown rice for serving
Green onions for garnish

Directions:
In a medium mixing bowl mix together cornstarch, soy sauce, sesame oil, and egg until a you form a batter. Toss cauliflower in batter until evenly coated, then set aside for about 15 minutes. In a heavy bottomed fry pan, add 2 tbs of peanut oil and heat until the pan is hot. Toss in cauliflower florets and fry over medium heat until evenly browned on all sides. Once cauliflower is prepared, start your sauce. In a separate sauce pan, add sesame oil and peanut oil with your garlic and ginger and saute for 2 – 3 minutes. Mix in remaining sauce ingredients and whisk constantly over medium high heat, until it comes to a low boil. Once sauce has thickened, add to the fry pan you cooked your cauliflower in and toss with fried cauliflower. Over medium low heat, toss the cauliflower until it is evenly coated in the sauce. Serve over brown rice and garnish with green onions.

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Edamame Succotash

succotashOne of the worst questions a coworker can ask you is “What size t-shirt do you wear?” It’s an awful question because it is so immensely personal, but also because it means that at some point soon you will be wearing a staff t-shirt. My husband loves free t-shirts. I do not.

The best response I got after I sheepishly admitted Large is “Really? You’re not a medium?!” Thank you Amy K. for making my day. This comment was made while I was eating today’s recipe for Edamame Succatosh, which is why I share it with you now! It comes from Vegetarian Times and makes for a nice twist on the traditional lima bean succotash. My version is a flavorful no-cook vegan dish that features fresh herbs and sweet yellow peppers which provide a bright crunch to the nutty edamame. It tastes great with a cup of pasta for a cold pasta salad.

EDAMAME SUCCOTASH

2 tsp. olive oil
2 chopped yellow peppers
1/2 chopped red onion
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 cups frozen shelled edamame, thawed
1 can whole corn kernels, drained
3 Tbs. white wine vinegar
1 cup fresh basil, chopped
1 cup fresh flat leaf parsley, chopped
½ tsp. salt
¼ tsp. freshly ground black pepper